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Extreme heat grounds American Airlines flights in Phoenix

The temperature in Phoenix, Arizona also touched almost 50 degrees Celsius, . or just 120 degrees Fahrenheit, one of the highest temperatures ever recorded in the city.The intense heat wave that’s been gripping much of the western U.S. in recent days has actually forced the cancellation of a number of flights out of Phoenix, Arizona – owing to the simple fact that the Bombardier CRJ aircraft to be used for the flights in question weren’t created to operate above 118° Fahrenheit.According to the statement, the planes have a maximum operating temperature of 118 degrees. The Big Bear City Airport is now closed due to a brush fire nearby.The hundreds of passengers impacted by the heat wave flight cancellations have been given the option of rebooking their trip or canceling the flight and getting a full refund.All of the affected regional flights were scheduled to depart between 3 and 6 p.m. local time, according to Tucson News Now. The record high is 122 degrees. It set the hottest known temperature in the world – 134 Fahrenheit degrees (about 56.7 Celsius degrees) on July 10, 1913. In most cases, thin air affects how high planes can fly, requiring more thrust from the plane’s engines, BBC reported.The airline canceled seven flights on Monday for the same reason. Here are five facts to keep in mind when dealing with intense heat. Larger jets, such as Airbus and Boeing, aren’t expected to be affected by this week’s heat. This area is relatively close to the equator, it is about 1,000 feet above sea level and the lower the sea level, the higher the temperatures.A heatwave in the USA has forced the cancellations of dozens of flights as soaring temperatures bring the worst heat the southwest has experienced in years.The prediction for Phoenix, Arizona Tuesday is 120-degrees – a mark hit only three times in history.Honestly, with temperatures that high, it’s no surprise that people are trying to get out of town, but also the idea of going anywhere – especially to the airport – sounds like hell.