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UK PM Thersa May and DUP have largely agreed support deal

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May, leaves 10 Downing Street in central London, Britain June 13, 2017.The government is scrambling for a “support and confidence” deal with the 10 MPs of the DUP which would deliver it a working majority of two.May made no comment as she left talks with DUP leader Arlene Foster.Major said: “We need to be prepared for the unexpected, we need to hope for the best but prepare for the worst”.After House Speaker John Bercow was re-elected without challenge, a chastened May quipped: “At least someone got a landslide”.Foster said her party would go into the talks “with the national interest at heart”.He told BBC Radio 4’s World at One programme: “The last thing anybody wishes to see is one or other of the communities so aggrieved that the hardmen, who are still there lurking in the corners of the communities, decide that they wish to return to some form of violence”. During the election campaign, May had used the “coalition of chaos” phrase to describe what a victory for Labour would look like.May has said the divorce talks, likely to be the most complex in Europe since World War Two, will begin as planned next week and her Brexit minister, David Davis, said Britain’s negotiating position was unchanged.In his Mansion House speech, Hammond was expected to make the case for a so-called “soft” Brexit, which prioritizes economic considerations over the more “hard” Brexit approach, which focuses more on limiting immigration and restoring sovereignty. The Evening Standard, edited by ex-Treasury chief George Osborne, is reporting that Cabinet ministers have initiated talks with Labour lawmakers.Mr Eastwood said in a statement: “The context in which the talks process is now being asked to operate in could have very serious consequences if there is any suggestion of a back room deal with the DUP“.Foster will nearly certainly ask for greater investment in Northern Ireland as part of the deal, as well as guarantees on support for pension plans and for winter fuel allowances for older people.May now faces the task of satisfying both the pro-European and eurosceptic factions of her party, keeping Northern Ireland calm and negotiating a divorce with 27 other European Union members whose combined economic might is more than five times that of Britain.Even the idea of an alliance is complicated, however.Foster’s rivals in Northern Ireland, such as Sinn Fein’s Gerry Adams, have objected.Britain’s Brexit ministry said on Friday that no deal could be struck on exiting unless the future relationship with the bloc was taken into account.The stakes for May are high.Meanwhile, the chief European Union negotiator has told the Financial Times that Britain that the clock was ticking on Brexit talks, and that Britain should be wary of further delays.He also pointed out that three months after Article 50 had been triggered, formal discussions had yet to start.