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Saratoga County resident died after contracting rare tick virus

“If there is virus attached in that tick then you begin to have symptoms which is swelling of that area and flu like symptoms like nausea”, Maxvill said.”It’s not something that any doctor will look for. you have to present it to them and by the time you find out it might be too late”, Kathy Potter said.The statement says the unnamed patients were residents of southern IN and both survived the infection. The state reported the diagnosis to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday, he said.The CDC tested his blood samples and confirmed the new type of virus.A family is speaking out after a woman died last month while carrying a deadly tick-borne illness known as the Bourbon virus. They have been found in Missouri, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Arkansas.DHSS staff, including local public health authorities, and the CDC are now collecting ticks in Missouri for Bourbon virus testing. Studies suggest that the virus is spread by the loan store tick, which is found through the southeastern and eastern United States, including IN and Kentucky. She became sick and gradually became worse and never recovered. Only one out of eight patients had died from the disease as of March 2014. In 2016, the state saw more than 200 cases of tick-borne illness. The two most common in Missouri are Rocky Mountain spotted fever, spread by the American dog tick, and ehrlichiosis, a bacterial illness spread by the Lone Star tick.Ticks are found throughout IN in grassy and wooded areas.After outdoor activities, people should conduct full-body tick checks using a hand-held or full-length mirror.The event, hosted by NY State Health Commissioner Richard F. Daines, M.D. conducted a tick collecting exercise and demonstrated how to avoid tick bites to prevent the transmission of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases. Tumbling dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 20 minutes will kill unattached ticks on clothing.Schulz said he recommends using tweezers to remove the entire tick and not leave the head behind. Ticks should not be crushed with the fingernails.