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GOP senator is latest to oppose health bill

Dean Heller became the fifth GOP senator to say he would not support the measure in its current form.”When President Trump called the House health care bill mean, I couldn’t agree more”, Cantwell said.GOP Sens. Rob Portman of OH and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia also expressed concerns about the bill’s cuts to Medicaid and drug addiction efforts.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has finally unwrapped his plan for dismantling President Barack Obama’s health care law.Gov. Christie’s spokesman has said he will not comment on this pending health care legislation, that the process of finalizing a bill is a long one.About 20 percent of all Americans and 40 percent of America’s kids get their health care through the federal government’s Medicaid program.Sen. Thune says a date for the vote on the new version is unclear but the expectation is it will happen late next week.”We have to send the message to our elected officials and we depend on our elected officials to champion our cause in Washington“, said Pamela Clarke, the health center’s CEO. Even President Trump reportedly called a different version of the bill mean. Paul has argued that the measure doesn’t go far enough to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and, like the ACA, bails out large insurance companies.”As we estimate the cost of the subsidies to buy insurance, we actually believe they may exceed, or at least equal, the subsidies that are under Obamacare”, said Paul.Maine Sen. Susan Collins and some others are anxious about the bill rolling back Obamacare’s expansion of Medicare and putting limits on federal funding of the program. “That’s not my opinion, but rather the conclusion of all objective analyses, from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which found that 23 million Americans would lose insurance, to America’s doctors, nurses, and hospitals on the front lines of our health care system”. Moderates are also wary of the legislation, which would make deep cuts to Medicaid and raise premiums for the poor, elderly, and sick, while benefiting people who are younger and wealthier.Many conservative senators have expressed concern over the current draft of the bill, worrying that it may kick many of their constituents off health insurance. The CBO is expected to weigh in on the Senate draft bill early next week.The bill would let states get waivers to ignore some coverage requirements under Obama’s law, such as specific health services insurers must now cover. A Reuters/Ipsos poll this month found almost 60 percent of adults believed the House bill would make insurance costlier for low-income citizens and people with pre-existing conditions.As he has multiple times since the ACA’s passage in 2010, Obama conceded that the bill was less than ideal and vowed to support any Republican-backed bill that “is demonstrably better than the improvements we made to our health care system, that covers as many people at less cost”.