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Lacking votes, Senate GOP delay health care vote

Finally Senator Ron Johnson, another conservative “no” vote, told CNN that it would be a “mistake” to begin debate on the bill as it’s now written.But it’s not OK with Democrats who uniformly oppose the measure, and moderate Republicans senators, at least four of whom said within hours of the CBO report that they would vote against even holding a debate on it.Paul tweeted that he was meeting with Trump at the White House Tuesday.The plan would create a new system of federal tax credits to assist people buying health insurance, while allowing states the ability to drop many benefits required under the ACA, such as maternity care and emergency services.In fact, Republicans called it a cut when Democrats reduced Medicare payments to providers to help finance Obama’s health overhaul.The delay seemed to be welcomed by senators still sitting on the fence. “I don’t think he’s getting into the details about what these bills actually do”, King told MSNBC.”People should do their due diligence to convince Ron Johnson that they can’t fix this bill”, said Scot Ross, leader of a liberal advocacy group One Wisconsin Now. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, one of the bills critics, praised the delay.”If the President wants to have a meeting with me I’m certainly willing to go and listen what he has to say”, she said. “I would highly doubt I would support it”, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. “We’re actually close to an agreement, but there are some important differences remaining”.Mike Lee will vote against the motion to proceed on the health care bill as it is now written, an aide told CNN, adding that Lee is “still negotiating with leadership to make changes as we have been since Saturday”.ABC News has the total number of senators opposed to the bill at six.This news comes on the heels of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report released Monday that estimates that 22 million more Americans will be uninsured by the end of the next 10 years under the Senate Republican health care plan than under current law, with 15 million more uninsured persons in the next year alone. She’s always been a question mark on how she’ll vote on the bill, and she told CNN Tuesday she was “concerned about the bill in the form that it is now”.All GOP senators were planning to travel to the White House later Tuesday to meet with President Donald Trump, one source said.With Republicans only able afford the loss of two votes, the bill appeared to be teetering on the edge by lunchtime. Following the CBO report, moderate Maine Republican Sen. “CBO analysis shows Senate bill won’t do it”.Conservative Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., said he would oppose that motion unless the bill was changed.Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, told reporters, “The hope is that we can at least have an agreement on what we can get enough votes on this week and turn to it as soon as we come back” from July 4 recess.Senator Dean Heller of Nevada said Friday he was concerned about the bill’s deep cuts to Medicaid and to subsidies for individual insurance coverage.President Barack Obama’s ACA is itself based on a plan created in the conservative Heritage Foundation and enacted by Republican Mitt Romney as governor of MA.After the Congressional Budget Office released its score of the bill yesterday, which predicted that 22 million people will lose coverage if the Senate bill becomes law, Collins tweeted her opposition.But McConnell does almost have $200 billion in extra deficit savings in his bill compared with the House legislation – which means he could dole out money for opioid treatment and other concerns moderates have been raising. A January poll by Pew Research Center, for example, found 60 percent of Americans say the government should be responsible for ensuring health care coverage for all Americans, compared with 38 percent who say it shouldn’t.The measure is aimed at ending the obligation for people to get private healthcare insurance coverage or pay a fine, as occurs now under the reform sponsored by former President Barack Obama.