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Northern Ireland’s politicians meet Theresa May at Downing Street

The formal beginning of the parliamentary session has been delayed due to May’s talks with the Democratic Unionists over an informal deal to secure the Conservatives a majority in parliament.He claimed such a deal could endanger the peace process.They have demanded that Northern Ireland Secretary of State James Brokenshire step aside from chairing any part of the talks.A Conservative source said there was so far no deal to announce and that a decision on the timing of any announcement would only be made once an agreement was finalised.”If there are difficulties with the Northern Ireland executive or with any one of a number of things that might well arise during the Brexit negotiations, it’s very important that there’s an honest broker – and the only honest broker can be the United Kingdom government”, Major said.”We will oppose any deal which undermines the Good Friday agreement”, Sinn Fein president, Gerry Adams, told reporters outside May’s Downing Street residence, in reference to the 1998 peace deal that ended three decades of sectarian violence.”The power-sharing institutions collapsed because of the DUP’s RHI financial scandal and the refusal of previous Tory governments and the DUP to implement previous agreements”.The Prime Minister needs the votes of the DUP’s 10 MPs to support her minority government as she hopes to steer government business, like the Queen’s Speech and Budget, through the Commons.”It’s imperative that both Governments recommit to the word, spirit and implementation of the Good Friday Agreement if there is to be any prospect of re-establishing the Executive”.During the appearance, Ms O’Neill said: ‘We made very clear to the prime minister that any deal between herself and the DUP can not undermine the Good Friday agreement.British Prime Minister Theresa May is to meet the head of the Northern Ireland branch of Irish nationalist party Sinn Fein in London on Thursday, Sinn Fein said in a statement.Michelle O’Neill, the Sinn Fein leader in Northern Ireland, said that the government must continue its role as co-guarantor of the Good Friday agreement.