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Police Drag Protesters With Disabilities Out Of Wheelchairs During Health Care Protests

The people protesting that effect were physically removed from the area, and footage of the protests and their aftermath shows Capitol Police removing one woman from her wheelchair as they took her away.A statement from Capitol Police said, “Many of the demonstrators, as part of their protest activities, removed themselves from their wheelchairs and lay themselves on the floor, obstructing passage through the hallway and into nearby offices”. She said the bill would cause “millions and millions and millions of people” to lose their health care and “inflict great suffering on veterans, on seniors, on working families, on rural communities”.Senate leadership attempted to write a more generous version of health care reform compared to the House-passed American Health Care Act (AHCA).Republicans say this approach will strengthen Medicaid by giving states more flexibility.Four GOP senators came out against the bill. Bustle has reached out to Capitol Police for comment.”The government wants to cut Medicaid, and for those that are disabled, that means cutting their lives”, said one ADAPT protestor.Blood on the floor outside of Leader Mcconnell’s office as protestors are physically being removed. Several protesters are wearing yellow shirts with “My Medicaid Matters” written on them.A man protesting the new Republican health care bill was dragged out of the U.S. Capitol by police on Thursday, June 22, 2017.Emerging from the session, McConnell did not answer when asked if he has the votes to pass the GOP proposal.McConnell unveiled the bill the same day. “I was on the ground in the office and then they put me in my wheelchair and then [I was] taken out of it and they carried me out”, she said.Lobbyists and congressional aides say the Senate bill would cut Medicaid, end penalties for people not buying insurance and rescind tax increases that Obama imposed to help pay for his law’s expansion of coverage.Johnson added in an interview with reporters on Capitol Hill that for now, his opposition is more about not having enough time to review the bill than the bill’s actual substance.